Archive for the ‘Adaptive Design’ Category

EDGELab’s Adaptive Design Project Awarded Grand Challenges Canada Funding

January 29th, 2015

Sae’s Painting of the Autism Rocker Design.

Ryerson researcher Dr. Jason Nolan is breaking down barriers for children with special needs. He has recently been awarded a $100,000 grant from the Stars in Global Health program through Grand Challenges Canada, funded by the Government of Canada, to fund his pilot project entitled “Adaptive Design International.” His project focuses on the creation of customized adaptations for children with special needs.

Dr. Nolan is Assistant Professor at the School of Early Childhood Studies and Director of the Experiential Design and Gaming Environments (EDGE) Lab. The EDGE lab is home to the Adaptive Design Studio, where Dr. Nolan and his colleagues work directly with children with special needs to create custom adaptable designs, working towards a goal of improving their well-being. Dr. Nolan uses accessible materials such as cardboard to create objects such as rockers that encourage self-stimulatory behaviour in autistic children.

The first step of the project is to set up a teaching and learning collaboration with partners to co-develop a training program and establish an adaptive design lab in Bolivia. Then Dr. Nolan will develop an online knowledge mobilization network linked to these international community partners.

Grand Challenge Canada’s Stars in Global Health program supports scientific/technical, social, and business innovation. Successful projects seek to create affordable health solutions that can be assimilated into cultural practices worldwide, with the capacity to affect positive change in low-to-middle-income countries.

“This collaboration will build on our shared strengths to form a solid foundation from which to share our social innovation with our neighbours and all around the world,” says Dr. Nolan. The long term goal of the project is to scale-up through additional industry and public partnerships, eventually becoming a template used in emerging communities worldwide.

Originally posted in Innovation: Ryerson University Research & Innovation Newsletter, Issue 13: January 2015

Cardboard Creations from the EDGE Lab

June 6th, 2014

The Canada Foundation for Innovation / Fondation canadienne pour l’innovation published this video about some of the projects going on in the lab last winter.

Jason Nolan, director of Ryerson University’s EDGE Lab in Toronto, designs and builds objects out of cardboard that allow kids with special needs to play freely and independently. Nolan showcased his work as CFI’s guest at the Canada Science and Technology Museum’s “Cool Science Saturday” event in Ottawa on February 15.

Photos courtesy of Jason Nolan and The Adaptive Design Association of New York

For more on this story, visit our blog:
http://blog.innovation.ca/cfi-funded-…

Talking Buttons helps kids vocalize needs

November 25th, 2013

Early childhood studies alumna Rubina Quadri is using a $27,000 Ryerson Social Enterprise Fellowship Federal Development Grant to develop a communication device for autistic children.

Rubina Quadri is helping children learn the art of communication. The Early Childhood Studies (ECS) ’12 graduate received a $27,000 Ryerson Social Enterprise Fellowship Federal Development Grant to develop a prototype of Talking Buttons, a reprogrammable touchpad to help autistic children communicate. Like fellow ECS graduate Sherene Ng, Quadri’s internship and work as a lab technician and research assistant in the EDGE Lab got her acquainted with adaptive design. Quadri started to learn about Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC) devices and how to enhance its capabilities. AAC are communication methods to help support or replace speech and writing for those with impairments. Read more at: “Talking Buttons helps kids vocalize needs

EDGElab HQP featured in GRAND Network for Excellence

November 19th, 2013

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EDGElab HQP Rubina Quadri and Sherene Ng featured on the GRAND website

Quadri and Ng were recently awarded a Social Venture Commercialization Fellowship for $30,000 from FedDevOntario and Ryerson to develop an original EDGElab property. The Talking Touchpad, which was initially conceptualized and developed by EDGE lab director Jason Nolan, is a wearable, customizable Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) device for children ages four to six who have speech disabilities (difficulty speaking or being understood). The Talking Touchpad allows children to communicate to others in a spontaneous, independent way. According to the The Canadian Association of Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists, speech impairments in school-aged children are frequently misdiagnosed as learning disabilities or behavioural problems. The Talking Touchpad can facilitate self-expression and help to diminish misunderstandings.

EDGE lab entrepreneur Sherene Ng featured in Financial Post

September 30th, 2013

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We’re proud to announce that EDGE lab’s Sherene Ng is in the news again! This time, it’s the Financial Post. Sherene describes her journey from intern to entrepreneur here …

 

EDGE intern Amy Fong creates an “Adaptive Dollhouse”

June 26th, 2013

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Amy Fong is a previous internship student who completed her fourth year placement at the EDGE Lab. She is currently finishing her last year in the Early Childhood Studies Program and has returned as a regular volunteer.

For her fourth year internship project, she created an “Adaptive Dollhouse” that included adaptive design pieces created at the EDGE Lab. She recreated and integrated many of these unique furniture pieces into her dollhouse in hopes to bring forth awareness of what adaptive design is, and what their functions are.

The special furniture pieces in the “Adaptive Dollhouse” can be seen and used as a learning tool to inform children about adaptive design.

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Supporting our projects: Fabric by Designers

January 24th, 2013

Many thanks to owner Avi Assor, for the generous discount he provided to the EDGE Lab for materials that will be used in our Adaptive Design lab. If you are in the Queen West area looking for fabric or notions, check out Fabric by Designers.

Bringing Adaptive Design to McMaster University

December 22nd, 2012

Jason and I had a great meeting with Brianna Smrke and Alisha Sunderji, two Arts and Science students from McMaster University, who visited the EDGE Lab to find out how they can make adaptive design happen in Hamilton. We’re all hoping that we can start a collaboration between our two cites.

Faculty of Community Services Student Achievement Event

November 19th, 2012

Students at the EDGE Lab recently showcased their work at the Faculty of Community Services Student Achievement Event. Interns Vivian Chan and Safiyah Nakhuda, featured the work they created during their field placement. Lab tech Rubina Quadri, presented a privacy divider built for a class research project about children’s privacy-seeking behaviour in group settings. Former intern Reilly Dow, created a poster summarizing what she learned at the Adaptive Design Association in New York when she was able to visit as part of her placement at the EDGE Lab.

These cardboard blocks made by Vivian Chan, are constructed to be a low cost alternative to expensive wooden block math sets.

Hard at work.
This assistive device, built by Safiyah Nakhuda, is used to help someone get out of a chair on their own.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Geta chair holders

November 8th, 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many interns and volunteers make a geta chair (a.k.a. rocker ) as a first project at the EDGE Lab. Volunteer Yuka, created customized shelving for them and a carrier so that they can be easily transported.

The carrier is painted by the EDGE Lab’s Artist in Residence, Sae Kimura.